That Conversation, Week 4- Not Every Tooth Is A Smile: The Cost Of Rape Culture

This week’s conversation is written in cis-het terms. -JBHarris

 

In the current culture, there is a shift towards everything mystic, cystral-powered, and the drawing of the what is called the Divine Feminine.Here is a brief definition (taken from Anna-Thea.com):

The Divine Feminine is sacred, sensual and often beyond the realm of day to day living. It’s something that can’t be seen but rather experienced and felt. It’s a healing force beyond the physical world. The Divine Feminine is also the positive expression of the feminine side of us that exists in both men and women. The divine feminine principle is within us all.

(taken from Anna-Thea.com)

My mother, when she went out into the world to subdue it, had this air about her. From the clothes, the perfume to the makeup she wore, she positioned herself in such a way that the world had to notice. It is that same confidence, that I take with me. This sense of self independent of what other people think, know or make up! It is this concrete sense of self that allows me to move through the world as I do. This same sense of self I desire to give to my children–my daughters.

There is a certain magic that allows being woman and feminine as you move about in the world. With that femininity, you see the grinning teeth of rape culture:  the world thinks everything pretty is community property.

As a girl whom was a pretty teenager, whom is now a woman, I can only respond with #MeToo.

What I tell my daughters is as they grow up, they have a right to wear what they want, when they want. No one is allowed to touch you when you don’t want to be touched. Just because you look completely delicious doesn’t mean someone needs to take a bite out of you!

As a woman and a mother, you stand at a precarious intersection. There is information that we know, we may be scared to utter to ourselves–let alone our girl children. I don’t want to cite rape statistics, or become compulsory about checking their phones, or to tell them date rape is a prolific reality. I especially don’t want to tell them most people in the world don’t want to believe when women are raped; there is still a class of people who believe Black women and girls can be raped. I don’t want to tell them there are those whom upon hearing a woman/girl is raped ask these two questions before asking if the girl/woman is a living victim or survivor.

Question 1:

“Well where was she at?”

 

Question 2: 

“What did she have on?”

 

The answer to both these questions is “It does not matter!” Women are not objects! The purpose of women is not to serve the sexual needs of a phallus public! We, as the fairer (stronger) sex, have the right to move and be in the world as they see fit. It doesn’t matter what ‘she had on’. It is that rage that makes your femininity stoic.

Rather than tell such bitter truths to children, you dress it up. You finesse it as best you can. For me, I learned that if I wore baggy clothes to catch buses home from work late at night, no one would be able to tell I was a girl. I learned to always have emergency transportation and a charged communication device. I learned if  I let someone know where I was–so if I didn’t come back, they would know where to look for me last.

This is the insidious nature of living in and around rape culture–it makes you aware of your mortality, your body and how both present/interact with the world. It makes you hyper-aware, scared more than you can whisper. Yet, you have to pretend it doesn’t phase you. The tears women shed over the knowledge we bear, fills ocean–and fills rain clouds which grow the seeds we plant in the lives our children.

My daughters, these fabulous children, I have to equip to deal with a world which shows not every tooth is a smile. And I have to believe the giving of my womanhood secrets, the teaspoons of my own pain, be enough to give them a clearer map. A way forward. A way to be both woman and warrior.

Then, I pray that it be enough.