BLACK HISTORY: WHY IT STILL MATTERS Week 1: ERASURE

Dr. Carter G. Woodson is an unsung hero. In the creation of Negro History Week, the magnitude of what he found—and what children that looked like him needed to know. With the advantage of time, we know what a vision this is, and what it means to participate in! When you have grown up in a society by which prides itself on control of a narrative and control of the people it effects, the need for exposure of the cancerous nature of those narratives!

As history told from the vantage point of the ‘victor’ will always be seen as, treated as, propaganda! This cannot be so in the new millennium in the age of Black lives matter! This cannot be so in the age of Black CEO’s and VPOTUS’s! The fact that we have to find out more about our history, and still making Black history daily, the needed to know more about who we are and where we come from is essential!

We as a nation can no longer afford to hide the achievements of the same people that helped to build it–involuntarily! This nation has a debt to Black people, and that is deeper than any sort of financial reparations. This debt is steeped in the continuous, deliberate measures to hide and dismiss the contributions and achievements of Black people. There is no reason for this! It cannot be excused! The reckoning for the adequate telling of history, you have to tell all of it!

History has to reflect the realities of Black writers, soldiers, artists, politicians, abolitionists, scientists and even Roman soldiers whom were Black! History, and those that ‘teach’ it have to accept and confront that their telling of history has been subjected to extensive whitewashing–for the comfort of White historians.

History has never been favorable to the unseen, even when they are an integral to the relayed victory. The best way to counter erasure is with radical visibility…and its time has come.