BLACK HISTORY: WHY IT STILL MATTERS-Education

The creator of the BECAUSE OF THEM WE CAN movement, Eunique Jones, has this as her mantra: “Children cannot be what they cannot see.” And I agree! You cannot expect a child to be excellent, without then ever seeing what excellence is. Black history is still made daily, and for that reason, we cannot stop.

From the inception of Negro History Week by Dr. Carter J. Woodson, to right now, you have to understand that magnitude of what it is he started. It is through the vessel and tool of education that shows people–especially children!–what they can be and do. For this reason, there is no reason to ever stop teaching Black history. It is through this month long opportunity that we show Black children who they are descended from, and remind them of what they can be.

It is through the opportunity of Black History Month, that I found my heroes. Those heroes are Ida B. Wells Barnett, Queen Hatshepsut and Dorothy Dandridge. The last two I found on my own due to my voracious reading habits.

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In Dorothy, I found that Black women have always been talented and hotter than any habanero pepper.

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In Queen Hatshepsut, I found that Black women have always run things–and wield power well.

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Well, in Ida, who I call my grandmother of the truest sort? I found a woman that looked like she could belong to my family who never let ‘No’ be her final answer. Ever!

Black children need to see both legacy and opportunities set before them and trails yet to be blazed! Black history is essential to the social encouragement and development of Black children. Period. Besides, you never know what will happen! While on this hero’s journey of raising Black children, it is essential for them to know they are not alone. They need to know their dreams are real, valid, and there may still be space to be the first to do that very thing. History is a road map–and when you teach Black children how incredible they really are? This is how you remind them to change the world–because of them we can; because of them we must.

[ images from cleveland.com, amysmartgirls.com and biography.com]

Introduction To Black History Month 2021

In this stolen land, inhabited by stolen and subjugated people, Black History Month feels like the most cohesive and organized protest to have. It still humbles me that Dr. Carter G. Woodson, historian and teacher, thought enough of is of us whom are alive and remain to leave us history in a land that prides itself on lies and erasure! With that said, Black History still matters. Moreover, how ones teaches Black history still matters! Lastly, why we teach Black history still matters!

For the month of February, I will be explaining and discussing why Black history is important from the vantage point of The Four E’s of why Black History still matters and matters how it should be taught:

February 6: Erasure

February 13: Education

February 20: Elevation

February 27: Excellence

Black history is still being made on a daily basis, and it would be disingenuous to not celebrate that, and not teach that. History is written by the winners, and their memories are valid. But if we are unaware of all those who contributed to that history how can we know what is or is not real? Losers sound like winners if the lie is good enough. Accurate teaching of history separates the lie the covers and the truth that separates.

BLACK HISTORY STILL MATTERS.